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  #751  
Old 10-09-19, 22:44
Peter Duggan Peter Duggan is offline
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Default Shifter column issues

Harry,

Based on our collective experiences, which includes Rob Love and the RCA Lynx, they seem to suffer from being exposed to the elements over time. Not surprising when you think about it. I was able to source from Mac's Auto Parts both the external cap (Robin's last picture) "Floor Shift Lever Housing Cap 32-32089-1", which works quite well and the internal cap which didn't work well since the top hole was too large to properly secure the spring. Gerry certainly solved that.

Perry,

Thanks for sharing your experiences. Sounds as if you and Gerry used the same approach to solving the problem. I'm looking forward to seeing his solution.

Peter

Last edited by Peter Duggan; 10-09-19 at 23:47.
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  #752  
Old 10-09-19, 23:06
Harry Moon Harry Moon is offline
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Default thanks!!!!

Floor Shift Lever Housing Cap 32-32089-1"
I just assumed a part like that would be hard to find, wow thinks. i ordered it already. will look better than my muffler clamp fix.
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  #753  
Old 11-09-19, 01:55
lynx42 lynx42 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Moon View Post
I had my shifter pull out on the way to the Abbotsford airshow last month.
My problem was the threads on the cap were so worn out they would just let the big cap pop off at a bad time. no fix for the thread so i cut it with a hack saw and used a muffler clamp to hold it tight so it doesn't pop off. I like the idea of a thicker pin so that goes on the todo list and does anybody know a source or application for the big thread on cover?
Harry, I think you will find that the cover is just an ordinary Ford gearbox tower cover. Any Ford gearbox top will fit, so have a look at those gearboxes out the back for a good one. Cheers Rick.
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  #754  
Old 11-09-19, 02:26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Moon View Post
I like the idea of a thicker pin so that goes on the todo list and does anybody know a source or application for the big thread on cover?
A lot of the shifter parts for the Borg Warner T98/T18 can be used on the WW2 Ford 4 Speeds.

The T98 and T18 boxes do not utilise the reverse lockout lever, but the available new shifter levers can be modified to fit this, or you can run without it.

https://www.novak-adapt.com/catalog/...t18-t19-parts/
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  #755  
Old 13-09-19, 04:08
Russ Gregg Russ Gregg is offline
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Peter, I have been away from the forum for a while and was also unable to make it to Aquino this year. Congratulations on getting plates on it at last, what a great milestone. The action shot you shared from Aquino is brilliant!
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  #756  
Old 14-09-19, 04:33
Gerry_Foster Gerry_Foster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Duggan View Post
Guys,

I'm starting to learn the finer details of the English term "fettling". I took the Lynx out for a spin before heading off to the Gatineau Air Show, when I found out that I could no longer engage fourth gear. After several attempts and severe grinding I trundled home in third.

I then attempted to adjust the clutch linkage with no success, I then talked over the problem with Robin Craig, who was able to persuade Gerry Foster to travel from Gananoque to try and resolve the issue.

In short order Gerry was able to determine that the issue was not with the clutch, but the shifter linkage, and zeroed in on the base of the shifter column which was corroded and sloppy. Partially rebuilt by myself.

The shifter column is now out and off for a proper rebuild.

Don't know where I would be without friends and MLU.

Peter

Attachment 108994 Attachment 108995 Attachment 108996
It was a pleasure to journey up and work on such a neat piece of history with yourself and Robin. It brings me great joy to be able to "repair" something these days. We live in such a throw away generation and as an automotive mechanic, things just are not made to be fixed anymore! To be able to re-machine parts in a mill that were once made by skilled craftsman completely by hand, designed on paper with a pencil.....this really is the reason I get involved in these type of projects! And for owners like Peter, who have a passion for their vehicles and a desire the return them to the way they were in service. Many days are spent diagnosing modern electronics and engineering/design flaws today, we as an industry have lost our way IMO. Simplicity, functionality and serviceability from this era of the Lynx and other MV's. 40 years from now, no one will be repairing the shifter in a Honda accord or Kia SUV......
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  #757  
Old 15-09-19, 05:46
Peter Duggan Peter Duggan is offline
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Default Character building

Guys,

Gerry and Robin showed up on Thursday with a well rebuilt shifter tower which was installed in short order. However Gerry was disturbed by some of the sounds originating from the clutch. After removing the battery pack and access plate we were able to expose the top of the clutch assembly. This revealed a grease line to the release bearing that had come adrift and disintegrated along with the remnants of the release bearing hub (retainer). It appears that this was incorrectly assembled by someone who shall remain nameless (myself).
Bottom line is that the engine now has to be pulled, which entails a fair bit of work just to expose the engine.
This project was to keep me busy in my retirement and is doing so, still enjoying every moment.
I am now looking for a replacement "Hub-clutch release bearing", O9B 7561, which appears to used in other applications as well as in the Lynx. Should anyone know where I can source one, please let me know.

Peter


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  #758  
Old 15-09-19, 09:20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Duggan View Post
I am now looking for a replacement "Hub-clutch release bearing", O9B 7561, which appears to used in other applications as well as in the Lynx. Should anyone know where I can source one, please let me know.

Peter
https://hagensautoparts.com/0820-09B-7561
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  #759  
Old 15-09-19, 15:20
Grant Bowker Grant Bowker is offline
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I would expect a Ford part number to be 09B 7561 rather than O9B 7561 (number zero rather than letter "Oh"). A crude Google on that produces results for both a bearing and a hub for the bearing. The hub appears discontinued at Macs but available at Dennis Carpenter... The bearing appears available at several sources.

Sorry, I forgot to include the link to the Google I did. Interesting to see that doing the search now brings up this discussion as a result... https://www.google.com/search?source...=1568593924523

Last edited by Grant Bowker; 16-09-19 at 03:34.
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  #760  
Old 15-09-19, 19:10
James P James P is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry_Foster View Post
It was a pleasure to journey up and work on such a neat piece of history with yourself and Robin. It brings me great joy to be able to "repair" something these days. We live in such a throw away generation and as an automotive mechanic, things just are not made to be fixed anymore! To be able to re-machine parts in a mill that were once made by skilled craftsman completely by hand, designed on paper with a pencil.....this really is the reason I get involved in these type of projects! And for owners like Peter, who have a passion for their vehicles and a desire the return them to the way they were in service. Many days are spent diagnosing modern electronics and engineering/design flaws today, we as an industry have lost our way IMO. Simplicity, functionality and serviceability from this era of the Lynx and other MV's. 40 years from now, no one will be repairing the shifter in a Honda accord or Kia SUV......
Two things. 1. WELCOME to MLU and 2. awesome first post. You are old school and appreciate vehicles from a time long past which in this day and age speaks volumes. Again, welcome aboard.
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  #761  
Old 15-09-19, 22:31
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Duggan View Post
Bottom line is that the engine now has to be pulled, which entails a fair bit of work just to expose the engine.
Peter, If it makes you feel any better, I just dropped the 300 pound nose armour off the Fox (after removing 31 1/2" round head slot screws and a few dozen smaller nuts and bolts) to access the clutch master cylinder that needs periodic servicing. I feel your pain!!

Last edited by Bruce Parker; 15-09-19 at 23:15.
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  #762  
Old 16-09-19, 02:11
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Robin Craig Robin Craig is offline
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Bruce,

was today your birthday? I know it was Peter's birthday, Happy Birthday.
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  #763  
Old 17-09-19, 03:42
Terry Witiuk Terry Witiuk is offline
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Default Peter's B'day

Peter. If in fact it was or is your B'day....Happy Birthday. All the best!
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  #764  
Old 17-09-19, 10:12
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The bearing carrier is probably the same as most of the Fords of that era.
In saying that there are bearings that are greasable and those that are sealed for life. They match up to the appropriate bearing carrier. Yours requires the greasable bearing and the bearing carrier that takes the grease hose.
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  #765  
Old 18-09-19, 01:59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Eades View Post
The bearing carrier is probably the same as most of the Fords of that era.
The bearing carrier that Mac's and Dennis Carpenter list is 48-7561, which was the standard carrier used in most cars and trucks and does not have the threaded boss to accept the grease lube line featured on the 09B carrier (as pictured in the Lynx parts diagram). This grease line (from a grease cup mounted on the exterior of the bellhousing) doesn't lubricate the clutch release bearing itself, it lubricates the carrier itself sliding on the gearbox bearing retainer.

Mac's and Carpenter's item is also a new repro, while Hagen's part is NOS Ford.
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  #766  
Old 18-09-19, 04:39
Peter Duggan Peter Duggan is offline
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Default Getting there

Guys,

Takes a bit of work on a Lynx to access the clutch assembly. I fortunately cleaned off a few shelves to store the parts, just didn't expect to fill them all. Armour bits took up the floor space. Now to wait for parts and expertise.

Tony,

Thanks for the heads up about Hagen's.


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  #767  
Old 18-09-19, 04:50
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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Peter, think of it this way...it keeps you young.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Duggan View Post
Guys,

Takes a bit of work on a Lynx to access the clutch assembly. I fortunately cleaned off a few shelves to store the parts, just didn't expect to fill them all. Armour bits took up the floor space. Now to wait for parts and expertise.

Tony,

Thanks for the heads up about Hagen's.


Attachment 109155

Attachment 109156

Attachment 109157
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  #768  
Old 27-09-19, 06:12
Gerry_Foster Gerry_Foster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James P View Post
Two things. 1. WELCOME to MLU and 2. awesome first post. You are old school and appreciate vehicles from a time long past which in this day and age speaks volumes. Again, welcome aboard.
Thank you James.

I don't consider myself old school @ age 37, but I have been trained by and continually surround myself with people like minded and that could be considered that

I've been born and raised with tools in hand on the coat tails of my father, who is a life long heavy truck/ diesel mechanic.

Last edited by Gerry_Foster; 27-09-19 at 06:15. Reason: Typo
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  #769  
Old 27-09-19, 06:36
Peter Duggan Peter Duggan is offline
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Default Ass backwards

Guys,

Gerry and his sidekick Robin showed up tonight to determine what ailed the clutch function. When the engine was separated from the transmission Gerry was dumbfounded to find the clutch release bearing and retainer installed back to front by some nameless neophyte (myself). Gerry was quite surprised that the clutch functioned at all.

Fortunately the damage was limited to the release bearing and retainer. After a new bearing and retainer were installed, the engine remounted, a rear wheel was raised in the air and the clutch function was dry tested and now appears to function as advertised.

Now to reassemble the rest of the Lynx and wait on Gerry to live test all the functions before I take a victory lap.

Peter


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  #770  
Old 27-09-19, 09:16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Smith View Post
This grease line (from a grease cup mounted on the exterior of the bellhousing) doesn't lubricate the clutch release bearing itself, it lubricates the carrier itself sliding on the gearbox bearing retainer.
Tony,I disagree! What I said is correct.
You need to look a little closer.
The non greaseable carrier(Ford call it a "Hub")09B-7561 has a flat surface that the "sealed for life" bearing sits against. The greaseable carrier(Hub, C09B-7561) has a hole that takes grease through to the bearing retainer, but it also has another hole that feeds grease to the bearing. The face that the bearing sits against is hollow, which allows grease to travel around between the bearing and the carrier, until it finds a hole in the back of the SE51-7580 bearing, which IS greased at the same time as the"hub" is greased on the bearing retainer.
I will also add that there is a third and fourth hole. These allow grease to the working faces of the 7515 fork.

Installing them the way Peter had it would not have helped.
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Last edited by Lynn Eades; 27-09-19 at 09:37.
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  #771  
Old 27-09-19, 10:18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Eades View Post
Tony,I disagree! What I said is correct.
You need to look a little closer.
Well, there you go. While I have seen a few of the grease line bearing carriers (09B) and the non-grease type (48), they have always had a non-greaseable release bearing fitted (post-service replacement?). From the examples I have seen, I had thought that they were only to lube the carrier on the gearbox retainer.

Are there any modern sources for a replacement of the SE51-7580 bearing?
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  #772  
Old 27-09-19, 10:21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Eades View Post
Installing them the way Peter had it would not have helped.
And now that Peter has oriented the bearing hub correctly, the grease fitting on the hub now points toward the hole in the bellhousing for the grease cup!

Peter, will you be getting a hose made up for this?
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  #773  
Old 27-09-19, 14:47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Smith View Post

Peter, will you be getting a hose made up for this?

When I did my carrier, I was able to use a short grease gun hose. In reality, I should not have bothered. For all the miles any of this restored equipment is going to go, we would never wear out a release bearing, or the tube that it rides on.



Peter: I have seen a lot of things installed in ways that boggle the mind, from thermostats to brake calipers. Yours is the first time I have seen the release bearing in backwards.
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  #774  
Old 27-09-19, 22:45
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Tony, try Aetna A2256-31 and National 2065 for a non greasable one
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  #775  
Old 27-09-19, 22:59
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Hub with brg. lube hole.
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  #776  
Old 05-10-19, 03:44
Peter Duggan Peter Duggan is offline
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Default On the road again

Guys,

Just like the old Willie Nelson song, the Lynx is now "Back on the road again". Gerry and Robin came by last night to ensure that everything was put together correctly again and much more. The shifter now works like a dream, without trying to engage fourth and reverse simultaneously, while the clutch works as advertised.

Took the Lynx out for a nice run today, long enough to realize that I now need to find myself some good goggles. Looking to find something period correct and effective.

Peter


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  #777  
Old 05-10-19, 06:57
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Dear Peter,

I am delighted to have done nothing more than be Gerry's sidekick and tool passing assistant and poor taker of pictures in this escapade. As you well know, Gerry is the mechanic not me but as his friend I have ridden shotgun on his regular Thursday trips to fettle the Lynx.

Gerry gets a distinct pleasure in working on vehicles because people would like them fixed unlike his everyday work.

How you were ever able to change gears as well as you did, still is incredible when you could see how that carrier assembly was on the shaft. You were so lucky, we shook our heads the whole way home after that discovery. We feel you must have horseshoes around every corner.

Any goggles and a good toque will be the order of the day for much more driving this fall, I can recall the syndrome of "Ferret forehead" gained one Remembrance Day in Ottawa, one that you will repeat if not suitably dressed, we forget so very quickly the protection afforded by a windshield (windscreen).

It has been fun to be a along for the ride. Fun is the key word in all of this.
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  #778  
Old 06-10-19, 16:06
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In my official role as Sidekick I am underemployed during these outings and spend much of the time looking at details and asking Peter what appear to be inane questions which make him think and then come up with the obvious answer, which defied my pea brain.

Sometimes, and it is rare, I ask a question that has no obvious answer.

In discussion it is obvious how the escape hatch opens on the inside, as there is a lever handle for that. The outside of the hatch has a keyhole into which a boss from the slam latch body inserts and comes almost flush to the outside, so that it could be used.

In discussion with Peter we searched the manual for a key to open the latch, the manual shows the complete equipment schedule and line drawing representations of the items. No key is illustrated.

When reading the same manual and the description of the parts and their operation it clearly states that the escape hatch opens from the inside using the lever and "a key from the outside".

There is no illustration of the key anywhere.

We surmised that the concept of opening the hatch from the outside was a good idea but in reality that notion was dropped and a key was not part of the vehicle kit.

Can anyone comment on this?

Was this slam latch (my name for it) used on any other vehicle and was there a key on those vehicles? Is there a photo of one?

This is the first of two conundrums we have found regarding this Lynx. Picture of the latch for recognition purposes.
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  #779  
Old 06-10-19, 17:11
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As the Lynx was based on the Daimler Scout Car, bodywise, that lock looks very much like a copy of the Daimler component and the key came with the lock (when I found a nos one) and not listed in the parts book, but is shown in the CES.
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  #780  
Old 07-10-19, 11:06
Alastair Thomas Alastair Thomas is offline
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Default Latch key

An interesting question to which I have no answer. I have made keys for my Lynx but that does not really help answering the main questions.
Why would you wish to open the hatch from the outside? I suggest that the only circumstance I can think of is when the vehicle has turned over and you wish to help the occupants out of it. So this raises the next question: how would you expect a casual passer-by to have a key? Were they a common item used on many other things/vehicles? If the vehicle is upright and the driver wishes to get in, in the case of the Lynx II, he would simply remove the canvass cover. In the case of the Lynx I, he would be carrying the keys to remove the padlock securing the roof hatch.
As anyone who has contemplated it, access via the escape hatch is very much a desperate option.
I am also intrigued as to where the driver would keep his key to the escape hatch.
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