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  #31  
Old 13-02-19, 02:10
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Removing transfer cases with a lifting table

Good Day,

Thought I might revive this thread with a recent operation- removing a F15-A transfer case from the chassis using a lifting table.

I bought a lifting table from Hare and Forbes last year and have used it for lifting and working on other heavy objects in the workshop. Although not essential for vehicle restoration it still is a handy item to have around. I put it to good use again two days ago to remove a transfer case from a F15-A. They are heavy items and the dual range transfer cases are even heavier.

I had to use it on grass but we haven't had rain for a while so the earth was fairly solid for the castors to roll on. If they had bogged I had a sheet of plywood on hand as a mat to roll it across. Would have preferred to do it on a solid garage floor but no space was available.

Once the table was fully lowered I lowered the left side of the case to the table to clear the chassis for extraction. I jury rigged the support for it but will make a more finished holding bracket for further lifting or removing operations.

The retaining bolts were very much wasted under the heads so I heated them with the oxy dull red then let them cool down. They backed out easily after that but beforehand they would not budge without the risk of snapping off.

Might add an oxy-acetylene set as another required tool for restoration!

Hope this is of some interest.

Cheers,
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  #32  
Old 13-02-19, 03:28
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default Before and after cleanup- F15-A transfer case

Good Day,

Thought I might add these for interest. The before and after cleanup of the above transfer case.

I've acquired 3 of these cases over the years and this is by far the filthiest.
I never saw so much mud and grease on either of the others.
Having said that, the crud did a good job of preserving it. After a lot of putty knife work and kerosene and brush a decent case appeared underneath it all.

Of interest it seems to be painted Khaki Green over a grey undercoat. The other two I have only have grey paint on them. Not knowing if the other two are older or newer it is hard to say when a change may have occurred as both were donor parts. This transfer case is from a confirmed 1943 truck.

Cheers,
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  #33  
Old 13-02-19, 04:15
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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Does lifting a CMP Chev transmission with your knee while aligning it into the bell housing and swatting mosquitos at the same time count? How about a 'wife', used to catch a thread or two as you lift a transfer case into position? She has to be quick because you can only heist that beast up there for a few seconds at a time.

How I survived my early CMP restoring days I do not know.
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  #34  
Old 13-02-19, 06:07
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Hi Bruce,

You are a brave man using a wife to help. I gave up asking mine 20 tears, I mean 20 years ago.

We are still together after 44 years but a few arguments while holding awkward or heavy objects and trying to explain things without being able to point to what I wanted convinced me it was a recipe for a divorce. Better to work alone.

Spending money on lifting equipment is cheaper in the long run, saves the marriage and saves my back too.

Cheers,
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  #35  
Old 20-02-19, 05:52
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default CMP 15 CWT transfer case holder

Good Day,

Here is something I made up this afternoon.
This is a more robust and safer means of holding the single speed transfer case for installing or removal than the jury rigged method I used recently to remove one.

No doubt a similar one could be made from scrap timber for the dual range transfer case on the larger CMP trucks.

The case is placed under the truck in the lowered position to clear fuel tanks. Once past the lowest point the case is raised into the correct position for the mounting holes. Lifting the jackshaft end of the case is quite easy on the table as most of the weight is on the driveshafts' end.

The folding support arm is made long enough that the case has to be lifted slightly past the resting point so that the arm can be dropped into the pocket between the ribs on the case. Once dropped into the pocket the case is lowered back against it providing a secure brace.

The hole is 1-1/8" diameter to clear the drain plug and allow the case to rest evenly on the lower ribs.

Hope this is of some interest.

Cheers,
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IMG_0022.JPG   IMG_0028.JPG   IMG_0027.JPG   IMG_0026.JPG  
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Last edited by Jacques Reed; 20-02-19 at 06:31. Reason: Added photo
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  #36  
Old 20-02-19, 13:41
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Phil Waterman Phil Waterman is offline
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Default Beauty in the simplicity of your design

Hi Jacques

The simplicity of your design is pure artistry, anybody planning on trying to remove/install the transfer case should be taking a look at your design.

It is one of those tools that once you make it you hang one the wall of the shop just so you have it next time you need it. I'll be looking at it to see what changes to make it fit the C60 series.

Thanks for sharing.

Cheers Phil
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  #37  
Old 20-02-19, 21:47
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default 1500 CWT transfer case holder

Hi Phil,

Thanks for your comments.

Like all devices the design evolved over the afternoon.

Clearances of bolt heads in the raised and lowered position required the 45 degree slope cut on the rear locating batten.
The larger block of wood was added on the front side to give support to the declutch shaft carrier, and therefore more stability in the raised position.
The square block of wood on the base was added to raise it slightly to enable a lifting strop to be passed underneath if no one was available to help lift it in or out of the holder.
And finally, the block of wood was added under the hinge on the base to raise it to the same height as the square block to enable it to lay flat for storage- on the wall until next required!

Cheers,
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  #38  
Old 04-09-20, 18:54
m606paz m606paz is offline
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Poor man axle nut tool
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  #39  
Old 04-09-20, 18:57
m606paz m606paz is offline
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Now i can disassembly a check the brake cylinder
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  #40  
Old 04-09-20, 19:36
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Ganmain Tony Ganmain Tony is offline
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Default Nice work Gentlemen!

Have only just discovered this thread.

Very clever work Mariano. Thanks for sharing.

Jacques once again you’ve come through with some generous sharing of your own time and effort. That tool for the trans. Case makes a potentially dangerous and awkward job much less so. As Phil said, a tool that can hang up in the shed.

Fantastic people on here.
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  #41  
Old 10-09-20, 13:48
lynx42 lynx42 is offline
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Default Common tools we all have and their uses.

DRILL PRESS : A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

WIRE WHEEL : Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'Oh sh*t'

DROP SAW : A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

PLIERS : Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.

BELT SANDER : An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW : One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle... It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS : Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH : Used almost entirely for lighting on fire various flammable objects in your shop. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing race..

TABLE SAW : A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK : Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

BAND SAW : A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST : A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to disconnect.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER : Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER : A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.

PRY BAR : A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER : A tool used to make hoses too short.

HAMMER : Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we are trying to hit.

UTILITY KNIFE : Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use.

ADJUSTABLE WRENCH: aka "Another hammer", aka "the Swedish Nut Lathe", aka "Crescent Wrench". Commonly used as a one size fits all wrench, usually results in rounding off nut heads before the use of pliers. Will randomly adjust size between bolts, resulting in busted buckles, curse words, and multiple threats to any inanimate objects within the immediate vicinity.

SON OF A B*TCH TOOL : Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling 'Son of a b*tch' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you will need.

How many do you have in your workshop?
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  #42  
Old 10-09-20, 15:36
m606paz m606paz is offline
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You are totally right!
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  #43  
Old 16-09-20, 00:37
Jacques Reed Jacques Reed is offline
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Default CMP Restoration tools- thread restorer file

Good Day,

A drill press is also a great tool to make triangular shaped holes in sheet metal!

All joking aside, another must tool is a thread restoring file. Besides the obvious repair of threads it comes in handy as a thread gauge to identify thread pitch if you don't have a set of taps or a thread gauge.

Not useable for identifying nuts obviously but still worth having in the toolbox with all the banged up bolts on an old vehicle.

Thanks Tony. I always believe in sharing information. No use taking knowledge with you to the grave. Does no one any good.

Cheers,
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  #44  
Old 16-09-20, 01:03
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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I've found that extra long arms with 3 or 4 elbows that bend both ways are particularly useful when working on carriers. Two are OK but three are better.
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