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  #781  
Old 07-10-19, 15:43
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Can anyone post a picture of one of these keys?

David
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  #782  
Old 12-10-19, 11:28
Alastair Thomas Alastair Thomas is offline
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Here is a picture of the key I made for my Lynx.
Not having any idea what an original key looked like this is clearly not authentic.
However the merit in showing it is to show that the business end is just a plain paddle with no subtle cut-outs.

Alastair

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  #783  
Old 12-10-19, 15:21
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Robin Craig Robin Craig is offline
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Alastair thank you for that, pretty much what I sketched out after taking apart Peter's spare lock. Just have to get some time to make it up. Interesting you made it a T handle, easiest to grasp on to.
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  #784  
Old 12-10-19, 21:47
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Lynn Eades Lynn Eades is offline
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If you take the lock assy to a locksmith, they can probably sell you a blank key that fits, off the shelf?
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  #785  
Old 12-10-19, 23:05
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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This is a surprisingly interesting topic.

To start with, how many people would have ever realized keys would be needed in WW2 to open doors on AFV’s?

Assuming the AFV in question HAS doors, it would seem highly logical you would not want ANY kind of handle assembly readily available on the exterior of the door, enemy infantry could take advantage of using.

But then why would you even bother securing the exterior of a door on a small, open topped vehicle like a Lynx in the first place? A well thrown hand grenade or weapon held above ones head would be devastating to the vehicle crew without even worrying about opening a door.

So maybe the vehicle flips over and traps the crew inside. Rescuers arrive on scene to lend assistance. How many of them would be carrying keys for that particular vehicle? Probably none. The only keys on the scene would be with the crew, trapped inside.

I don’t think the Lynx was alone in this concept. Didn’t the Staghound, C15TA and Otter all come with some form of securing the exterior or the doors? If these were different from the Lynx style of latch, then you have now introduced ‘complexity’ into the key situation. Not a good plan.

Last thought on the matter. With the Lynx style lock, can it be operated by insertion of a standard issue slotted screw driver?

The reason this topic peaks my interest so much is my wife’s Uncles all served with the 12th Manitoba Dragoon’s during the war. One of them, late in the war, received a Commendation for his efforts rescuing the crew of a Lynx. He was a Driver of a Staghound that was following one of the Regimental Lynxes in heavy rains on a mud road. The Lynx slipped off the crown of the road on a curve and flipped over in the ditch. The fuel slipped and ignited. The Lynx Driver got out vis an escape hatch but the Gunner was thrown from the vehicle and pinned under the rear deck. Debbies Uncle stopped their Staghound and ran to try and pull the Gunner clear of the Lynx but could not. The Gunners clothing caught fire and Debbies Uncle got the rest of his Staghound Crew to rock the Lynx back and forth enough they were able to pull the injured Gunner clear.

So the escape hatches can work as intended, but if the Driver had been injured inside the overturned Lynx and unable to open the door, I doubt any of the Staghound crew would have been carrying spare keys, even though they probably knew they needed one to open the hatch from the outside.

David
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  #786  
Old 12-10-19, 23:58
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Richard Farrant Richard Farrant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Dunlop View Post
This is a surprisingly interesting topic.

To start with, how many people would have ever realized keys would be needed in WW2 to open doors on AFV’s?

Assuming the AFV in question HAS doors, it would seem highly logical you would not want ANY kind of handle assembly readily available on the exterior of the door, enemy infantry could take advantage of using.

But then why would you even bother securing the exterior of a door on a small, open topped vehicle like a Lynx in the first place? A well thrown hand grenade or weapon held above ones head would be devastating to the vehicle crew without even worrying about opening a door.

So maybe the vehicle flips over and traps the crew inside. Rescuers arrive on scene to lend assistance. How many of them would be carrying keys for that particular vehicle? Probably none. The only keys on the scene would be with the crew, trapped inside.

I don’t think the Lynx was alone in this concept. Didn’t the Staghound, C15TA and Otter all come with some form of securing the exterior or the doors? If these were different from the Lynx style of latch, then you have now introduced ‘complexity’ into the key situation. Not a good plan.

Last thought on the matter. With the Lynx style lock, can it be operated by insertion of a standard issue slotted screw driver?

The reason this topic peaks my interest so much is my wife’s Uncles all served with the 12th Manitoba Dragoon’s during the war. One of them, late in the war, received a Commendation for his efforts rescuing the crew of a Lynx. He was a Driver of a Staghound that was following one of the Regimental Lynxes in heavy rains on a mud road. The Lynx slipped off the crown of the road on a curve and flipped over in the ditch. The fuel slipped and ignited. The Lynx Driver got out vis an escape hatch but the Gunner was thrown from the vehicle and pinned under the rear deck. Debbies Uncle stopped their Staghound and ran to try and pull the Gunner clear of the Lynx but could not. The Gunners clothing caught fire and Debbies Uncle got the rest of his Staghound Crew to rock the Lynx back and forth enough they were able to pull the injured Gunner clear.

So the escape hatches can work as intended, but if the Driver had been injured inside the overturned Lynx and unable to open the door, I doubt any of the Staghound crew would have been carrying spare keys, even though they probably knew they needed one to open the hatch from the outside.

David
David,
What has to be remembered is that the hull shape and layout followed the Daimler Scout Car and obviously the Lynx was initiated to bolster the numbers of these vehicle types for Commonwealth forces. The Daimlers had folding steel roofs up until around 1944. I have to say you would have to be a small person to get out of the door, with a crew of two. I was driving a Dingo this week and there is very little room to maneuver inside one. The door is useful when servicing a Dingo, but the thought of having to use it in an emergency is not good.
The Humber armoured vehicles also needed keys to open the hatches/doors and the keys had a female square in them. The Daimler key is not as basic in the end as the Lynx key shown.
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  #787  
Old 14-10-19, 02:17
Alastair Thomas Alastair Thomas is offline
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I was working on the Lynx today and, no, you cannot unlock the door using a screwdriver.
Alastair
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  #788  
Old 14-10-19, 03:18
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
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The Fox (and Otters) have a square metal shield on the exterior hull hatch over a 1/2" stud that works on a lever from the inside. 'Gerry' couldn't open the hatch (or any other) unless he had a special tool with a 1/2" square socket. The metal shield is made in such a way that a tab/handle in a crew members pocket would easily slide in and open the hatch. I expect the vehicle crew would each have an issue handle in their battle dress pocket. I use a screw driver with an inverted 1/2" socket welded to the end as my 'key'.
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