MLU FORUM  

Go Back   MLU FORUM > MILITARY VEHICLES > Post-war Military Vehicles

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 14-03-21, 17:12
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Rob, correct, I'm talking out of turn mentioning the wheel cylinders, my bad.

Wayne, unfortunately the "supervisor" usually shows up with a few cold ones causing the tools to lose their momentum, lol. She's actually refinishing a 100 year old rocking chair alongside my project. I'll put up with the dust to spend quality shop time with the boss.

Tony, I don't usually attend too many swap meets or even garage sales which is bad in one way not finding cool/useful stuff and good with not dragging home more projects, lol.

Phil, thanks for the compliment! Funny you mentioned solder as I casually thought of soldering the whole thing together or heating the heck out the washer then installing it. I like the solder idea coating the washer and will try that trick.
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 15-03-21, 17:20
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Has anyone else ran into two - single lip seals installed in their t-case output shaft? I read in some of the off road forums that this was quite common in lieu of the felt piece. It didn't affect the surface of the yoke so I'll be going back to OEM unless that's a bad idea?
Attached Thumbnails
Dual seals.jpg  
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 15-03-21, 17:39
SteveJ's Avatar
SteveJ SteveJ is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
Posts: 92
Default

Great job Pete.
With regard to solid copper washers. They do harden but you can anneal them by heating them cherry red then quenching in water. This softens the copper again and they will not leak.
__________________
SteveJ
1943 Dodge WC52
1986 Armstrong MT 500 CDN Motorcycle

Last edited by SteveJ; 15-03-21 at 17:42. Reason: Correction
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 15-03-21, 19:47
rob love rob love is offline
carrier mech
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Shilo MB, the armpit of Canada
Posts: 6,931
Default

Are you saying that someone stacked two single lip seals in place of the double lip seal normally in that location? Sounds like someone's attempt to cure a problem leak.

Sometimes the problem isn't the seal at all, but rather the oil sneaking through between the shaft and the yoke. There was a rubber washer you could locate underneath the washer and nut retaining the yoke. You can put RTV onto the washer, shaft face, and the face of the yoke to prevent that. And, of course, make sure your breather valve or fording vent lines are clear.

Another thing that can be done to prevent the transfer case from getting overfilled whilst climbing hills, is to replace the transfer case to transmission bearing with a sealed bearing.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 16-03-21, 05:21
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Steve, thanks for the tip for annealing, I'm pulling out all stops to seal this thing up once and for all!

Rob, yes there was a thick single seal and a thinner one in there. It seemed to work ok too. I've been doing a ton of research on sealing up the t-case and one of the tricks as you mentioned, is oil migration between the shaft and yoke; same thing I dealt with on the differentials.
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 16-05-21, 18:10
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

And the saga continues......tons of work accomplished! I picked up the motor from Edmonton and mated it to the drivetrain.
The rundown on progress:
-checked over the transmission, t-case and pto and installed new seals and gaskets. Oil is in and no leaks so far!
-removed the dual seals on the t-case output shaft, re-mounted a metal dust cap and re-installed the proper seal and felt washer.
-installed all required components inside the z-shaft for the clutch linkage as they were non-existent
-the anti-rattle clips were also missing on the shift levers so they're in place now
-dealt with the bent skid plate was that someone pointed out to me (I honestly thought it was supposed to look like that), so I removed it, re-blasted and it had a date with a 50 ton press. It's nice and straight now and re-painted.
-managed to get the brake lines to stop leaking after annealing the washers, replacing the tee fitting and master cylinder banjo bolt.
-replaced one bad u-joint and put a new (homemade) slip yoke seal and split washer on the rear driveshaft.

The winch is in progress now and once painted and mounted, I can finally say mechanical is done.

Of course I got a run in the front bumper after painting so it's up for a sand and re-paint.

And the good news, the front springs have relaxed enough now that I was able to remove my pre-load tensioners.

Check out the cool knurled piston that came out of the motor! It's going to become a polished up, pen holder.

I'll add another post for more pictures.

Next step is the body...argh!
Attached Thumbnails
Jeep1r.jpg   jeep2r.jpg   jeep3r.jpg   jeep4r.jpg   jeep5r.jpg  

__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006

Last edited by Peter Phillips; 16-05-21 at 18:16.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 16-05-21, 18:13
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

More pictures.....
Attached Thumbnails
jeep6r.jpg   jeep7r.jpg   jeep8r.jpg   jeep9r.jpg   jeep10r.jpg  

__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 17-05-21, 05:52
super dave super dave is offline
Dave Good
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Onoway, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 686
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Phillips View Post
And the saga continues......tons of work accomplished! I picked up the motor from Edmonton and mated it to the drivetrain.
The rundown on progress:
-checked over the transmission, t-case and pto and installed new seals and gaskets. Oil is in and no leaks so far!
-removed the dual seals on the t-case output shaft, re-mounted a metal dust cap and re-installed the proper seal and felt washer.
-installed all required components inside the z-shaft for the clutch linkage as they were non-existent
-the anti-rattle clips were also missing on the shift levers so they're in place now
-dealt with the bent skid plate was that someone pointed out to me (I honestly thought it was supposed to look like that), so I removed it, re-blasted and it had a date with a 50 ton press. It's nice and straight now and re-painted.
-managed to get the brake lines to stop leaking after annealing the washers, replacing the tee fitting and master cylinder banjo bolt.
-replaced one bad u-joint and put a new (homemade) slip yoke seal and split washer on the rear driveshaft.

The winch is in progress now and once painted and mounted, I can finally say mechanical is done.

Of course I got a run in the front bumper after painting so it's up for a sand and re-paint.

And the good news, the front springs have relaxed enough now that I was able to remove my pre-load tensioners.

Check out the cool knurled piston that came out of the motor! It's going to become a polished up, pen holder.

I'll add another post for more pictures.

Next step is the body...argh!

Do I see cap bolts holding the PTO on ?
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 17-05-21, 15:09
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

You sure do, Dave. They're quite functional and aren't going to prevent a win at any show I'll attend. Remember, I've title this "refurbishment".......... not restoration. My original intent was to make this jeep safe to drive, dependable and leak free; and maybe learn a lot along the way while having fun. I'm getting there, lol
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 18-05-21, 21:00
SteveJ's Avatar
SteveJ SteveJ is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
Posts: 92
Default

Hey Pete
did you stick with the rear driveshaft that was installed or did you tidy up the spare one and use it?
__________________
SteveJ
1943 Dodge WC52
1986 Armstrong MT 500 CDN Motorcycle
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 18-05-21, 22:26
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveJ View Post
Hey Pete
did you stick with the rear driveshaft that was installed or did you tidy up the spare one and use it?
I stuck with what was there after installing a new cork seal w/split washer in the yoke and replaced one u-joint.

One day I may bring in the extra one to a driveline shop in Edmonton and get a new stub put on, balanced and install new U-joints.
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 30-05-21, 19:22
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Got the winch installed now. Found a good facsimile of the original cable clamp to attach the chain to the cable. I had to manufacture my own elongated links on each end of the 5/16" chain links too which was a challenge but turned out OK.
Attached Thumbnails
Winch1r.jpg   Winch2r.jpg   Winch3.jpg  
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 25-06-21, 16:29
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Next step is the inspection and re-sealing of the steering gear box. Luckily it looks great with no corrosion or free play anywhere. I've also decided to put the body on hold until I get the steering box and electrical installed and test run this unit. I will even attempt to install a seat and faux firewall for the clutch and brake pedal to rest against and attempt to move it through all it's gears to make sure I didn't mess anything up....although everything bench tested fine The body is in really decent shape corrosion wise with only one broken bolt in the hat channel under the drivers floor. There's more stripping required and a few holes to weld up and I'll work away at the floor dents then off to sand blasting. The blaster is well versed in automotive blasting and will keep the heat off the components to avoid warpage.
Attached Thumbnails
Steering Box R.jpg   body 1 r.jpg   body 2 r.jpg   Body 3r.jpg   Body 4r.jpg  

__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 25-08-21, 18:28
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Update: Got the electrical in place, she rolls over and has spark. The faux firewall is good enough to hold the dash board in place and allowed me to temporarily install some pedals to run it on jack stands to test everything out. It developed a leak at the drain fitting in the radiator which the rad shop repaired with no hassle. I have a start up date of September 10th at the place where the engine was rebuilt which I'm understandably excited about. I started picking away at the tub and am very happy with the limited corrosion I'm seeing. Good thing these things sling grease and oil around like they tend to do .
Attached Thumbnails
Jeep1r.jpg   Jeep2r.jpg   Jeep3r.jpg  
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 25-08-21, 21:27
Lynn Eades's Avatar
Lynn Eades Lynn Eades is offline
Bluebell
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tauranga, New Zealand
Posts: 5,266
Default

Copper should be copper. Has anyone tried annealing the washers?
Copper work hardens pretty quickly and heating them to red hot softens them again.
In theory, should last for ever.
__________________
Bluebell

Carrier Armoured O.P. No1 Mk3 W. T84991
Carrier Bren No2.Mk.I. NewZealand Railways. NZR.6.
Dodge WC55. 37mm Gun Motor Carriage M6
Jeep Mb #135668
So many questions....
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 26-08-21, 01:08
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Eades View Post
Copper should be copper. Has anyone tried annealing the washers?
Copper work hardens pretty quickly and heating them to red hot softens them again.
In theory, should last for ever.
Actually I did follow advice and annealed the new washers with success. Lots of instances on the inter-web around the same issues....you'd think it wouldn't be an issue but...
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 26-08-21, 01:46
Grant Bowker Grant Bowker is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 2,095
Default

There are internet claims the same can be done with aluminum sealing washers (as used on BMW motorcycles and other applications) that have work hardened .
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 05-09-21, 16:41
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Took advantage of the nice weather to power wash and degrease the jeep tub in preparation for body and paint. What I didn't expect is for it to fall on my right foot. Luckily it was a glancing blow and not the full weight which I guess is around 300#. I don't think anything is broken as I can move around with minor discomfort, it's just swollen, even more this morning. I still might get an x-ray today to please the wife as my ears are bleeding from the nagging
And for the record there is only minor damage to the one tab under the tub that attaches to the frame, easy fix...tough old things they are!
Attached Thumbnails
jeep1.jpg   jeep2.jpg   jeep3.jpg  
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 05-09-21, 17:02
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is offline
GM Fox I
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: SW Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,402
Default

Ouch!! Safety first, although in my younger days it wasn't always and I'm now surprised I didn't get more banged up than I did.

Now, if I stop making noise in the garage in pops the wife to ask if I'm still alive. Not sure if that's affection or getting the life insurance guy on the phone faster.
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 06-09-21, 16:52
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

That's a good one Bruce, I guess time will tell which way she's leaning, lol. After the wife gave me poo poo, she said I should use an engine lift or something to lift it.....I said like the one that's folded up right there. Why is the obvious so out of reach sometimes
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 12-09-21, 17:01
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default It's Alive!

Took the Jeep down to Fort Saskatchewan for a start up at the engine builders place on Friday. I'm happy to report the start up went well and it's running nice and smooth. At normal running temperature, I have 25# of oil pressure at idle and 42# around 2000 rpm which I think is good. We did confirm that I need to do a carb rebuild to sort out a lean idle and hesitant acceleration. I was sorry to see that my interim gauge set-up didn't work so we stabbed on remote gauges to monitor the engine vitals. Maybe my wooden dash board is the cause of this as all the wires are hooked up correctly? I'm going to run remove the wheels and run this through all the gears and transfer case option to ensure I put everything back together correctly.
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 12-09-21, 18:19
Marc Montgomery's Avatar
Marc Montgomery Marc Montgomery is offline
aut viam inveniam aut fac
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 558
Default

Peter- love the work you're doing.


there seems to be quite a dialogue online among expert mechanics, (racers, hotrodders, bikers, restorers) and even manufacturers of copper gaskets re annealing... some say heat red and quench, others say heat red and air cool, because quenching rehardens the metal...
I was taught to quench, but am wondering now...???
__________________
I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
Straining upon the start. The game's afoot!
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 13-09-21, 11:43
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland - previously Suffolk
Posts: 506
Default

Marc,
If annealing steel, it makes a huge difference how quickly you cool from red hot because of crystal growth within the steel. Copper does not really do this so it makes little difference how quickly it is cooled.
Also the copper items that are used in engines are of such small thickness that they will naturally air cool very quickly so the choice would be to slow the cooling process even more which would be difficult and pointless.

David
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 13-09-21, 22:47
Lynn Eades's Avatar
Lynn Eades Lynn Eades is offline
Bluebell
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Tauranga, New Zealand
Posts: 5,266
Default

Following on from what David said, Quenching tends to clean the copper, so that's the plus there.
__________________
Bluebell

Carrier Armoured O.P. No1 Mk3 W. T84991
Carrier Bren No2.Mk.I. NewZealand Railways. NZR.6.
Dodge WC55. 37mm Gun Motor Carriage M6
Jeep Mb #135668
So many questions....
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 15-09-21, 15:45
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

More positive news . I removed the wheels and put the jeep on sturdy wooden blocks and ran it through all gears and 2/4wd driving functions and it performed nicely. I just finished stripping and de-greasing the tub, tailgate, windshield frame and assorted floor plates in preparation for sand blasting on Friday. And what a surprise when a fellow member informed me that I need to ground my dash in order for the gauges to work, ....they now work .
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 15-09-21, 17:05
rob love rob love is offline
carrier mech
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Shilo MB, the armpit of Canada
Posts: 6,931
Default

You are lucky they work. I found that usually on those gages, the fuel in particular, as well as the temp and oil pressure, would burn out without a ground.
The later M-series added a short ground wire from the panels to the dash which helped prevent this. There are times that you have the dash backed out (cable or gage replacement) that turning on the ignition switch can have bad results.

Same goes for testing gages on the bench. You must provide a ground to the case or the negative stud before applying power and sending variable negative thru the wire.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 16-09-21, 15:24
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rob love View Post
You are lucky they work. I found that usually on those gages, the fuel in particular, as well as the temp and oil pressure, would burn out without a ground.
The later M-series added a short ground wire from the panels to the dash which helped prevent this. There are times that you have the dash backed out (cable or gage replacement) that turning on the ignition switch can have bad results.

Same goes for testing gages on the bench. You must provide a ground to the case or the negative stud before applying power and sending variable negative thru the wire.
Interesting Rob, never knew that bit of info...thanks . I haven't tried the fuel gauge but the ammeter, oil pressure and temp works fine. Interestingly I don't remember seeing a ground symbol coming from anywhere on the dash....unless I missed that?
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 16-09-21, 17:22
rob love rob love is offline
carrier mech
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Shilo MB, the armpit of Canada
Posts: 6,931
Default

The gauges take their ground thru the case, or for the later plastic housed gages, thru the clamp and onto the studs on the back of the case.

Many guys test the gages on the bench by putting power to the power terminal and full negative onto the sending unit terminal. The results are usually quick and not good....you need the case grounded. Cheap insurance for any M-series vehicle is to run a ground wire from one of the screws for the panel lamp (use a longer screw than original so you can get a ring terminal, a couple of internal tooth lock washers, and a nut onto it) and run the ground wire to a screw behind the dash, such as the screws holding the circuit breaker in place. You can put a set of Douglas connectors in between to make it easier to remove the complete panel if that day ever comes, or leave it as a solid wire.

Last edited by rob love; 18-09-21 at 02:17.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 17-09-21, 16:20
Peter Phillips Peter Phillips is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Cold Lake, Alberta
Posts: 187
Default

Great advice Rob, thanks. I'll install the ground mod as I have some spare Douglas connectors and wiring.

Got the tub stripped down and only broke one footman loop screw and have to drill one stripped screw out. My original sandblaster guy is AWOL now so the hunt is on to find someone that is competent to blast sheet metal
__________________
Peter Phillips
1952 M38Cdn
1953 M100Cdn
1951 PE-95K Gen Set
MVPA
Cdn Forces 1986-2006
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 18-09-21, 00:42
Chris Suslowicz Chris Suslowicz is offline
Junior Password Gnome
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: England
Posts: 716
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rob love View Post
The gauges take their ground thru the case, or for the later plastic housed gages, thru the clamp and onto the studs on the back of the case.

Many guys test the gages on the bench by putting power to the power terminal and full negative onto the negative terminal. The results are usually quick and not good....you need the case grounded. Cheap insurance for any M-series vehicle is to run a ground wire from one of the screws for the panel lamp (use a longer screw than original so you can get a ring terminal, a couple of internal tooth lock washers, and a nut onto it) and run the ground wire to a screw behind the dash, such as the screws holding the circuit breaker in place. You can put a set of Douglas connectors in between to make it easier to remove the complete panel if that day ever comes, or leave it as a solid wire.
That's a disaster waiting to happen. A lot of vehicle gauges are the "hot wire" type that must have a resistance in series (i.e. the sensor) to limit the current, otherwise the "hot wire" will simply act as a fuse and melt, rendering the meter completely worthless.

Another meter type you cannot do this with is the thermocouple ammeter used in some radio equipment (may be marked "aerial current", "RF amps", "HF ammeter", or similar), where the measuring circuit is a very short piece of resistance wire (so it doesn't waste much of the transmitter power) with a thermocouple spot-welded to the middle of it. The meter movement has no air-damping vane attached (because the thermocouple is also low resistance and provides magnetic damping to the pointer movement), and if you touch a flashlight cell (even a tiny one like an AA) to the terminals, the short-circuit current through the resistance wire will blow it like a fuse.

A dealer did this before my very eyes at the War & Peace show (Beltring) one year, and made contact before I realised and shouted "Stop!"....

"What?"

"You've just destroyed that meter?"

"Nonsense, the needle moved."

"The needle moved _once_, and will never move again because you've blown the wire inside. Try it again and see."

(Dealer tries it, predictably nothing happens.)

"Do you still want it, I'll reduce the price?"

"No, it's beyond repair now." (etc.)

Pity really, it was for the Aerial Coupling Unit 'J' and one of the hard to find plug-in meters.

(I did spend some time explaining why he blew it, I don't know if the lesson stuck.)

This is why I normally carry a pocket multimeter to shows and radio rallies, so I can test them (safely) before purchase.

Chris.
p.s. There exist "Hot wire" RF ammeters as well, and they are just as fragile.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Info needed: M38cdn Lyle Watkins The Restoration Forum 0 01-11-17 20:47
For Sale: 1952 m38cdn Ryan Harriman For Sale Or Wanted 0 12-08-16 05:03
For Sale: M38Cdn Air Cleaner Jeep-Livin! For Sale Or Wanted 0 08-03-16 03:52
M38CDN Tub M38CDNBill For Sale Or Wanted 0 12-01-08 01:49
M38cdn Denis Post-war Military Vehicles 2 03-03-04 17:16


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 18:45.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Maple Leaf Up, 2003-2016