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  #1  
Old 27-07-19, 04:44
maple_leaf_eh maple_leaf_eh is offline
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Default Nickname for CMP cwt trucks

Was looking at some materials from a veterans' association, and the text mentions receiving some 15 cwt trucks. The writer added their nickname as "Cut Weights". Has anyone else seen, heard, used that phrase?
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  #2  
Old 28-07-19, 07:47
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Not me, but the Chev 8 cwts are "puddle jumpers" or "Pee Jays" down here in N.Z.
In Australia I think they are all "Blitz's"
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  #3  
Old 28-07-19, 08:03
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Yes the generic name for a CMP in Australia is Blitz, or Blitz Buggy, plural is Blitzes.

The 15cwt Sigvans were called butter boxes, a name also applied to the boxy local design gun tractors.

Cab 11/12s (not that we have many of the short wheelbase variety) are generically called Monkey Face or Desert Blitz.
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  #4  
Old 28-07-19, 19:08
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Webb View Post

The 15cwt Sigvans were called butter boxes, a name also applied to the boxy local design gun tractors.
Hi Keith,
I have also heard the Blitz signals van refered to as a 'pie van' by Australians.
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  #5  
Old 28-07-19, 20:41
Harry Moon Harry Moon is offline
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  #6  
Old 28-07-19, 22:07
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Default Pie van

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Farrant View Post
Hi Keith,
I have also heard the Blitz signals van refered to as a 'pie van' by Australians.
You're right Richard, I had forgotten that one!
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  #7  
Old 29-07-19, 01:04
rob love rob love is offline
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I have heard "carrot weight", and a few other interpretations from people who did not know what the cwt stood for.
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  #8  
Old 11-08-19, 09:36
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Treadjacker2000>Enter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Farrant View Post
Hi Keith,
I have also heard the Blitz signals van referred to as a 'pie van' by Australians.
Ahh, "Pie Vans", beloved of Ex-Sevicemen for dubious nutrition:
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  #9  
Old 28-07-19, 14:09
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Hanno Spoelstra Hanno Spoelstra is offline
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Default "Cut Weights"

Quote:
Originally Posted by maple_leaf_eh View Post
The writer added their nickname as "Cut Weights". Has anyone else seen, heard, used that phrase?
Terry, I have not come across that nickname before.

H.
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  #10  
Old 30-07-19, 20:22
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Hey guys, who switched on the Threadjacker?!?
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  #11  
Old 30-07-19, 21:26
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Hey guys, who switched on the Threadjacker?!?
I've never heard a CMP called a threadjacker. Thread stripper, finger crusher or knuckle bloodier sure, but never threadjacker.
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  #12  
Old 30-07-19, 22:58
Mike Cecil Mike Cecil is offline
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Hanno,

We are just going the extra 'country mile', seeing who can measure up, or who gets weighed down before its 'return-to-topic' time. (sorry, I'll stop now...)

(I have not heard a CMP called a threadjacker either, Bruce, but I've called mine a few things that are not printable here, when experiencing all those aspects you mentioned!!)

Mike
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  #13  
Old 31-07-19, 00:20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Hey guys, who switched on the Threadjacker?!?
Threadjacker2000 was a secret line of code that Geoff Winnington-Ball wrote into the Forum's software to ensure that threads randomly took off in wild, uncontrollable directions before sometimes returning to the original theme. You can't turn it off, you can't manage it, it just exists in the Forum. It may even be the spirit of Geoff running it!

To try and get back on track, CMP's have also been called Bulldog face or Pug Faced trucks at times, too.
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  #14  
Old 31-07-19, 01:22
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is online now
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I'm not quite sure, but could this...just possibly...maybe...be a threadjack of a threadjack? A double threadjack? Or a jack squared perhaps? Very rare indeed.
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  #15  
Old 31-07-19, 04:09
rob love rob love is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Parker View Post
Very rare indeed.

Not rare on this forum. I have said it for years...decades even. The threads on this forum meander like a winding creek through the countryside. But it is all knowledge and interesting.
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  #16  
Old 31-07-19, 14:03
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Default Now back to your regular programing

Quote:
Originally Posted by maple_leaf_eh View Post
Was looking at some materials from a veterans' association, and the text mentions receiving some 15 cwt trucks. The writer added their nickname as "Cut Weights". Has anyone else seen, heard, used that phrase?
Hi

The abbreviation "cwt " was explained to me when I first got my HUP some 40 years ago as "carry weight" or "century weight " in both of these explinations the amount of weight being referring to was 100 lbs. By those explanations a 15 cwt truck was meant to carry 1500 lbs.

Now according to TM 30-410 September 30, 1942 , US War Department entitled, HANDBOOK ON THE BRITISH ARMY WITH SUPPLEMENTS ON THE ROYAL AIR FORCE AND CIVILIAN DEFENSE ORGANIZATIONS. The purpose of this manual reads "The object of this handbook is to furnish a simple guide for the U.S. soldier cooperating with the British."

This book in its abbreviations section lists- cwt Hundredweight

Cheers Phil
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  #17  
Old 31-07-19, 16:22
Mike Cecil Mike Cecil is offline
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Phil,

Not far off the mark if your source of the explanation was an American:

1500 lbs = 3/4 of a US (short) ton of 2,000 lb, so you can see the logic from a US point of view concerning 15 cwt (ie 3/4 Imp ton).

US Military nomenclature works in short tons, for example, the 'semitrailer, Van, 6 ton, 2-wheel' has a rated payload of 12,000 lbs, ie 6 x 2,000 lb, and the Ben Hur 'Trailer, tank, water, 1 ton, 250 gallon' has a payload rating of 2,000 lb.

Mike
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  #18  
Old 31-07-19, 18:29
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Default Short vs Long Ton

Hi Mike


There are stories of some interesting confusion over payloads being quoted in long tons are understood as being short tons. There is one story from the Berlin Airlift about a C47 being loaded to the limit thinking it was short tons and actually being long tons. The goonie bird carried it but it was a long flight. There also is a story were they mixed up the weights for perforated decking confusing the weight for aluminum decking and loading steel decking. The pilots made the flight with the engines wide open, after it landed in Berlin the plane was scrapped.



Moral of these stories is the old saying "two peoples separated by a common language."



The book I was referring to also explained that 4x4 quarter ton was referred to in Britain as a Blitz Buggy.


Cheers Phil
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  #19  
Old 31-07-19, 19:27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Waterman View Post



The book I was referring to also explained that 4x4 quarter ton was referred to in Britain as a Blitz Buggy.

Hi Phil,
I have a British War Office Data Book on Bearings. It lists every ball and roller bearing on vehicles in service, whether British, Canadian or US built. It is wartime dated. It lists only the Bantam with the title 'Blitz Buggy', so it must have been an official name by the British.
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  #20  
Old 31-07-19, 23:43
Bruce Parker Bruce Parker is online now
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Default Weights and measures

At the risk of taking a meandering tributary of Rob's creek, this might be interesting to those following the second or third hijack of this thread. I don't feel too bad at it as a General Motors product and it might help you out in the kitchen.
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