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  #61  
Old 27-11-19, 11:09
Patrice DEBUCQUOY Patrice DEBUCQUOY is offline
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Default Caterpillar D7

Hi Hanno,

Unfortunatly there is quasi nothing about the Armoured Cats.
Some very minimal infos in these books :

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Hope it helps,
Cheers,
Patrice.

Last edited by Hanno Spoelstra; 01-12-19 at 15:05. Reason: attached pictures
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  #62  
Old 30-11-19, 22:09
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrice DEBUCQUOY View Post
Unfortunatly there is quasi nothing about the Armoured Cats.
Some very minimal infos in these books :
Thanks Patrice.

Attached is a post-war picture of two Armoured Dozers which got stuck on Red beach at Westkapelle:

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  #63  
Old 01-12-19, 21:39
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Footage from British Pathe:


The Walcheren Landings 1944: https://britishpathe.com/video/the-walcheren-landings
Covering both Infatuate I and II


Western Front War Report 1944: https://britishpathe.com/video/western-front-war-report
Various shots of Alligators crossing Scheldt.


Invasion Scenes Europe: British Troops: https://britishpathe.com/video/invas...itish-troops-2
E.g. Armoured Dozer on White Beach North
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Invasion Scenes Europe 1944: https://britishpathe.com/video/invas...enes-europe-53
Commonwealth soldiers resupplied during Battle of the Scheldt, possibly at Sas Van Gent, Oct 1944
E.g. Weasel in action
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  #64  
Old 01-12-19, 23:40
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Default Armoured Dozers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Of the four Armoured Dozers which embarked, only three disembarked of which two fell victim to mines ashore. Only one Armoured Dozer which reached the town.
I checked one of my sources again (Operation Infatuate Landing Table and Beaching Diagram V2), and found more Armoured Dozers were embarked. Indeed four (4) Dozers embarked with the 87 Sqn Aslt Regt RE in LCT nrs. 4, 5, 6, 7. Initially I only counted those, as they embarked with the Sherman tanks I (tried to) focus on.

Additionally, 509th Field Company, RE embarked with one (1) Dozer each on LCT nrs. 8, 22, 25, 26 (from 510 FC Coy?) and 27, totaling nine (9) D7 Armoured Dozers.

History of the Royal Engineers, Vol IX, 1938–1948 states six (6) disembarked, of which all but one (1) got stuck in the soft mud:
Quote:
As part of the operation to clear the River Scheldt and port of Antwerp, 59th GHQTRE under the command of Lt-Col E.W.L Whitehorn assisted the Commandos of 4th Special Service Brigade in their amphibious assault on Walcheren on 1 November 1944. One platoon or section of sappers was allocated to give general assistance to each of the five Commando units, and a detachment of the field park company landed with six bulldozers, leaving the rest of the field companies for beach maintenance.
(...)
The Commandos had sailed from Ostend and landed successfully before dawn at Flushing, but the bulldozers of 59th GHQTRE ran into soft mud and only one could be extricated, and most of the engineering stores were lost, though casualties among the sappers were light.
At least four Armoured Dozers could be found as spoils of war on the beaches for many years after the fighting, until they were scrapped or used as back-fill to reconstruct the sea dyke.

I have labelled them "A", "B", "C", and "D" which have no other meaning than to discern them on photos.

Two dozers "A" and "B" and "C" on the north side of the breach, where all the AFVs got hopelessly stuck:
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Dozer "D" on the south side of the breach. It seems to have a name on the top edge of the rear armour. As with other vehicles found in the village after the war, the census numbers seem to have been painted out (possibly because they had been struck off charge).
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  #65  
Old 01-12-19, 23:57
Alex van de Wetering Alex van de Wetering is offline
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To me, dozer "D" looks like a D6. Dozer "C" could be a D6 as well, judging from the pipes.....but hard to see from this far away.
Dozer "B" does look like a D7

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Last edited by Alex van de Wetering; 02-12-19 at 00:06.
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  #66  
Old 07-03-20, 11:05
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Default On a busy beach

This picture was taken at the north end of TARE WHITE, which was only a small part of the landing zone where it proved possible to go onshore successfully.

Left: Armoured Dozer

Centre: Sherman V gun tank, T-148829(?) "WOLF OF BADENOCH" Turret No. 10, 1LBH "A" Sqn HQ, disembarked from LCT "5 BRAMBLE".

Right: Sherman V gun tank, T-147976 "COCK O'THE NORTH" Turret No. 11, 1LBH "A" Sqn HQ, disembarked from LCT "6 CHERRY". It still has its wading trunks fitted.

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Picture via Marcel van Hoepen
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  #67  
Old 07-03-20, 20:16
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
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That dozer is a D7. You can tell by the position of the air cleaner intake (centred, just in front of the driver Vs RHS just behind the radiator on a D6) The exhaust is in a different position too but that is much less obvious.

David
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  #68  
Old 08-03-20, 17:55
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Default Dozer David

Thanks David, I knew you would bring your expertise of plant equipment into the equasion.

I found surprising little info about the Armoured Dozer (and the wade-proofed one), many documents identify them incorrectly.

Hanno
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  #69  
Old 16-04-20, 12:41
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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For the last two years or so I’ve been working (on and off) on what will be a PDF net.book covering the vehicles left behind at Westkapelle after the war. Interesting to see that this thread began around the time I also started digging into this very subject. Some good stuff here that I hadn’t discovered or worked out on my own yet, and also a lot of conclusions that I had also drawn independently

Let me begin by saying I’ve been assigning letter-number codes to keep vehicles straight. With four AVREs, three Crabs and three bulldozers on the beach alone, I felt this was pretty much a necessity, to avoid having to repeat things like “the AVRE facing the sea” or “the bulldozer by the end of the antitank wall” all the time. Let me show you what I mean:

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These are JPEGs exported from the net.book as I have it in Adobe InDesign at the moment (yes, they’re in Dutch; I’ll do an English translation when I’m done writing the text). On the colour map, the pale lines represent the village during the war, based on a 1942 energy company map and a 1944 British map as used in the landings. White boxes point out the 1940s situation, yellow boxes the modern one.

On to some specifics:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
The (as of yet) unidentified Sherman V Crab on LCT 1005 was commanded by Lieutenant S.A. Miller
(…)
I do not know its name or Turret number, but it has a WD census number ending with “...53”:
I make it T-14…53 but I can’t make out the middle two numbers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Sherman V, T-148829?, name WOLF OF BADENOCH, Turret No.10
(…)
In July 1946, it still proudly displays its turret number "10", while the hull side is adorned with random paint splashes. Could this be the result of a house painter cleaning his brushes?
It certainly looks like that to me. I’m more puzzled by the dark patch at the rear of the righthand side of the hull — I’m wondering if this isn’t green paint, also from someone cleaning a brush but more neatly?

I think its WD number is T148323, but like you, I can’t be sure. I’ve also wondered why the paint is darker where the numbers were. It looks like they flaked off the tank, but then why is the paint underneath darker than what’s left around them? Based on my understanding of the type of film likely used and the colours of British tanks leads me to think that if the tank was overpainted in British colours, this kind of flaking would expose either American OD or SCC 2 brown, both of which should appear lighter in photos than SCC 15 paint, not darker. But there’s also a darker patch where the first aid kit has been taken off the hull rear.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Another ca.1945 photo showing Turret No.2. According to the caption of this photo it is located at the address Markt 92-96 in front of the monumental house "'t Herenhuis". Markt is a section of the road adjacent of the long Zuidstraat, so this caption helps us to pinpoint the location more precise.
Attachment 97958
(Source)
This tank was in front of the house of Westkapelle’s most prolific photographer, Neeltje* Roelse (1921–2008, later Flipse-Roelse after she married), who lived in the middle of that row of three houses. Anyway, the got moved backwards and forwards a couple of times, as I’m sure you’ve also figured out by now

* Commonly called “Nee”, English pronunciation “nay”.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Sherman V Crab, T-148656
(…)
Circa 1946, still in the same spot and still complete but the WD census number seems to have been painted out. Maybe because it has been struck off census?
Note the road wheel missing from the left rear bogie:
Attachment 97949
(Source)
As best I can tell, this picture was taken from the window in the roof of the Roelse house.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Sherman V Crab, T-148656
By 1960 it had lost its flail booms and was left as a memento halfway on the dyke, on the land side:
Attachment 97951
(Source)
It’s in a field at the foot of the dyke, behind the Westkapelle war museum that was housed in the Leitstand (fire control bunker) for the German coastal battery MKB “Westkapelle” (known as W15 to the British). In modern terms, if you look at this map, it’s more or less to the left of where it says “Dominicus B.V.”

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Thanks Patrice.

Attached is a post-war picture of two Armoured Dozers which got stuck on Red beach at Westkapelle:

Attachment 110543
The one on the left is actually just the armoured cab and the winch. For some reason, somebody appears to have removed the actual dozer and left these. The dozer originally faced more or less east, but in the photo above, the cab is the other way round and lying on its side. The only explanation I can think of is that the dozer was salvaged, and of course nobody needs an armoured cab on it — but it’s kind of perplexing that they would have gotten the thing to run after having been submerged twice a day in salt water for a year or more …

The general area here, BTW, is known as ’t Stort (“the Dump”) because rubble was dumped there after the war, mostly behind the antitank wall. Until the dyke was strengthened in the mid-1980s, you could still see sections of round brick wall lying there, that came from the windmill on the dyke that had been destroyed in the bombardment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
the south side of the breach
That area is known as Erika — technically, the dune top with the radar station is. In the 1940s the dune was known as platten dune (“flat dune”), but during the war the Germans built radar posts there, known as Monika I, Monika II and Erika; the latter name appears to have stuck for the dune after the war. To anyone from Westkapelle, the area pictured above would be bie Erika (“near/in the vicinity of Erika”).

It’s this area that I’m currently trying to figure out too, by the way. There’s little material to go on, though.
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  #70  
Old 16-04-20, 19:30
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
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Well done Jakko,
It is good to have new eyes looking at this in such a thorough manner. Welcome to the forum.

On the question of the two armoured dozers, I can see why you formed the opinion that you have but the winch is bolted to the rear of the actual tractor not to the armour so it is very unlikely that it would have been removed and left when the rest of the machine was salvaged. The winch would also have had a good value as either a winch or scrap (if damaged) so would not have been left without good reason. I suspect that actually just the tracks and frames had been removed but have no evidence for this.

David

Last edited by David Herbert; 16-04-20 at 19:39.
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  #71  
Old 16-04-20, 20:53
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Herbert View Post
Well done Jakko,
It is good to have new eyes looking at this in such a thorough manner. Welcome to the forum.
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Herbert View Post
On the question of the two armoured dozers, I can see why you formed the opinion that you have but the winch is bolted to the rear of the actual tractor not to the armour so it is very unlikely that it would have been removed and left when the rest of the machine was salvaged.
There’s at least one picture in which you can tell that the cab and probably the winch have been left behind, but the rest of the dozer is gone:

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(sorry, no source as I didn’t record where I found this)

On the very right of the photo, there’s obviously the cab on its side and what to me looks like the winch behind it.

I’m greatly puzzled by the pronged thing on the edge of the water, by the way. I first thought it was a bulldozer chassis or the arms of the dozer blade, but on inspection of the parts in the Resicast armoured dozer kit, I found it to be the wrong shape for either.
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  #72  
Old 17-04-20, 01:18
Alex van de Wetering Alex van de Wetering is offline
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Jakko,

Great to see you here!

Quote:
I’m greatly puzzled by the pronged thing on the edge of the water, by the way. I first thought it was a bulldozer chassis or the arms of the dozer blade, but on inspection of the parts in the Resicast armoured dozer kit, I found it to be the wrong shape for either.
I do think they are the arms of a dozer.....but maybe not D7, but D6. I think you see the arms and the two smaller arms that connect to the corner of the blade, that alows it to set the blade at an angle. I can see that someone salvaged the crawler part of the dozer leaving the blade, winch and armor at the beach.
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  #73  
Old 17-04-20, 03:39
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
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Jakko and Alex,

I have to agree about the cab and winch, having now seen the photo in post 71. I am sure that the pronged thing is the blade frame with the blade still attached. It is up side down and with the blade angled away from us - to the left if it was still on the tractor. The sharp 'prong' pointing to the left in the photo is the lower corner of the blade. I suppose that the guy that dismantled the tractor may have come back for the remaining bits the next day - he may not have had the ability to recover the tractor in one piece given that the tanks and tractors could not move on that beach.

David
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  #74  
Old 17-04-20, 12:04
Alex van de Wetering Alex van de Wetering is offline
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Quote:
I am sure that the pronged thing is the blade frame with the blade still attached. It is up side down and with the blade angled away from us - to the left if it was still on the tractor. The sharp 'prong' pointing to the left in the photo is the lower corner of the blade.
David, that's the odd thing.....it does look like the blade is upside down, but the arms are definately not upside down. They have a kink upwards to clear the dozer suspension, so the arms face the normal way up. Maybe the thing we thing is the point of the blade is actually some other piece of steel laying a few feet away from the dozer(?)

The armour lying on it's side identify the dozer as a D6; The D6 was the only one that had the sides completely parrallel, while the D7 had the armor slightly sloping outwards.

Quote:
The one on the left is actually just the armoured cab and the winch.
Do you mean the one in the picture Hanno posted in post 64 ? Than I would have to disagree. The armour and winch are still the right side up, and you can see the left and right track next to the dozer and I think I even see the edge of the blade. To me it looks like the dozer has completely sunk in the beach, as Hanno also mentioned, in which case the picture predates the picture you posted yesterday.

Alex
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  #75  
Old 17-04-20, 12:06
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Now you point it out, yes, it does look like that This would probably mean that this dozer (S11 using my numbering, “A” by Hanno’s) was a D6A, right? I’ve not been able to find a photo of it that shows the exhaust pipes clearly enough, but if, as Alex says, this is the arm type used on the D6 then it probably came from this dozer.

The other option is the dozer at the far side of this group (S53/“C”), which was a D6 if I’m not mistaken (though I only learned how to tell them apart by reading this thread ). On the other hand, if that had been disassembled, why would they drag the blade all the way here?

Last edited by Jakko Westerbeke; 17-04-20 at 12:13.
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  #76  
Old 17-04-20, 12:12
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex van de Wetering View Post
Do you mean the one in the picture Hanno posted in post 64 ? Than I would have to disagree.
You’re right, I was confusing two pictures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex van de Wetering View Post
the picture predates the picture you posted yesterday.
Most are hard to date accurately anyway
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  #77  
Old 17-04-20, 12:14
Alex van de Wetering Alex van de Wetering is offline
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I have been meaning to post some pictures of D6 and D7 dozers to show how one can tell them apart, but looking for pictures I noticed that Michel Saberly has already done that a few years ago.

Attached pictures are by Michel Saberly.
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Old 17-04-20, 14:18
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex van de Wetering View Post
David, that's the odd thing.....it does look like the blade is upside down, but the arms are definately not upside down. They have a kink upwards to clear the dozer suspension, so the arms face the normal way up. Maybe the thing we thing is the point of the blade is actually some other piece of steel laying a few feet away from the dozer(?)

Alex
Sorry Alex but I think that you are wrong. When viewed from the side of a complete dozer, the braces that set the angle of the blade are parallel to and lower than the top edge of the blade frame as seen in Michels photos. That fits in with the whole assembly being upside down on the beach. Also in the zoomed photo you can see the circular saucer shaped depth plates just behind the blade that help to control depth of cut.

In Michel Saberly's photos you can see that he has highlighted that these dozers has their Cat works numbers painted onto the front of the armour. These are in the 1T series which denotes that they are tractors built under licence from Caterpillar. A Cat built D7 would be a 7Mxxxx and a D6 would be a 4R or 5Rxxxx depending on track gauge. Cat works numbers, for say 7M D7s, started at 7M1 and ran to 7M9999. The next D7 would be a new prefix, in this case 9U1 which ran to 9U9999 and then another new prefix. Changes were brought in as required and a new prefix did not necessarily mean a new model but often did. There are a lot of 3T and 4T D7s about which are post war license built 7Ms.

David

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Last edited by David Herbert; 17-04-20 at 14:34.
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  #79  
Old 17-04-20, 14:25
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Herbert View Post
I suppose that the guy that dismantled the tractor may have come back for the remaining bits the next day - he may not have had the ability to recover the tractor in one piece given that the tanks and tractors could not move on that beach.
It looks like the winch was left on the beach:

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(source)

This is a photo from 31 July 1947, and the cab and winch are there but the arm isn’t. It still surprised me that the tractor would still have been operational, but maybe the winch wasn’t and so it was left behind, while the blade was salvaged for re-attaching to the tractor?
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  #80  
Old 17-04-20, 15:08
Alex van de Wetering Alex van de Wetering is offline
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Quote:
Sorry Alex but I think that you are wrong. When viewed from the side of a complete dozer, the braces that set the angle of the blade are parallel to and lower than the top edge of the blade frame as seen in Michels photos. That fits in with the whole assembly being upside down on the beach. Also in the zoomed photo you can see the circular saucer shaped depth plates just behind the blade that help to control depth of cut.
Hi David,

I see what you mean....the blade and arms are indeed upside down and I was wrong. But, has the whole assembly been cut from the dozer with a torch maybe? As there seems to be something odd with the shape...(last kink towards the pivot point seems missing)

Quote:
The arms actually pivot from the brackets that you can see from the outside of the tractor at a point about midway between the top rollers but quite low down. The weight of the tractor is carried by a big leaf spring pivoted to the sump on a normal tractor (I am not sure if it is a solid mount on these) which is higher than the blade arms so there is no need for the arms to avoid it. The underside of the arms are sloped upwards at the ends to give better ground clearance when the blade is up. In the zoomed photo you can see the circular saucer shaped depth plates just behind the blade that help to control depth of cut.
That's what I don't agree on; the arms on an Armoured dozer are shaped over the transverse leaf spring, as they would otherwise interfere with the spring. You can't curve the arms under the leaf spring, as that would very much limit the up and down movement of the arms and blade. The shape might be a bit different between D6 and D7, but you can see the idea here on the surviving D7 dozer.
Dozer blades that attach to the ouside of the dozer suspension don't have this problem obvisously, as there is no spring, so the arms can be straight.

Picture source: https://www.militarymodelscene.com/d7-rmoured-dozer
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  #81  
Old 17-04-20, 15:14
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Jakko.

Can you clarify something for me?

In your colour aerial photo with the wartime overlay of the location outlined in white, there is what now appears to be a large, white sand public beach in the area marked “t’ Gat”. In the Northwest corner of this photo you can clearly see the cluster of assorted armour that never made it ashore and the outer white lines of what appears to be the original wartime shoreline pass roughly North/South down through that area before swinging off to the East at the bottom of the photo.

Was the land flooded out subsequent to the wartime landing, never diked back off and reclaimed, or am I just getting the information wrong from the two photos? I was so interesting in tracking the postwar movements of some of the armour, I only just noticed this possible loss of land mass.

I cannot help think some of that armour did more travelling in town after the war than they managed during the landing.

David
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Old 17-04-20, 17:22
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
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Hi Alex,

After I typed the second part that you quoted in your last post # 80 I realized that it didn't add up so deleted it and replaced it with the first part that you have quoted. Well done for getting both !

However you have shown that the arms do indeed go over the suspension spring (sorry) so I think that the explanation is that the arms on the beach have had the pivot points cut off them where the arm bends down to the pivot - so about 30" removed. Looking at the zoom of the beach photo one can persuade oneself that one can see a cut box section.

For the benefit of others the suspension spring is a massive transverse spring the ends of which engage with the track frames just in front of the forward top roller. The track frames themselves pivot on the shaft that goes through the sprockets which also rotate around that shaft.

David
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  #83  
Old 17-04-20, 18:11
Alex van de Wetering Alex van de Wetering is offline
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Hi David,

Quote:
so I think that the explanation is that the arms on the beach have had the pivot points cut off them where the arm bends down to the pivot - so about 30" removed
I agree......it does seem they took the easy way out, by just cutting the arms off!

Quote:
Well done for getting both !
I pressed the quote button, but it took me a while to find a picture to display what I meant. When I did find a picture and posted, I noticed the original text was missing! I did however post, as I think it help us learn more about these Armoured dozers, vehicles I have always found very fascinating.

Alex
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  #84  
Old 17-04-20, 20:15
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Dunlop View Post
Was the land flooded out subsequent to the wartime landing, never diked back off and reclaimed, or am I just getting the information wrong from the two photos?
You’ve got it exactly right: the old dyke ran as the pale lines show, then curved more to the southeast just below the map until it got to the dune now known as Erika; from there it continued on to the southeast. When the dyke was reconstructed after the war, it was built in a big curve the other way — the footpath along the top is clear on the aerial photo, and pretty much follows the curve of the new dyke — to connect the remaining part of the old dyke to Erika. A sandy beach then formed at the foot of the new dyke. (The lake marked “De Kreeke” at the lower right also didn’t exist before 1945 — that area was farmland back then.)

If you want to see how the coastline changed because of the RAF’s actions, http://topotijdreis.nl is a good resource: type “Westkapelle” into the search box at the top right, then play with the date slider along the left.

“’t Gat”, BTW, translates as “the Gap” — the reason for that name is probably obvious

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Dunlop View Post
I cannot help think some of that armour did more travelling in town after the war than they managed during the landing.
Crab T148656 certainly did
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  #85  
Old 19-04-20, 11:59
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
Studying another picture of the gap pictured shortly after the battle show an overturned Weasel trapped under the steel beach defences:

Attachment 110346
There’s also an LVT (2) in that photo, I just noticed. Zoom in on the area to the left of the rightmost bunker in the distance:

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Name:	LVT (2).jpg
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ID:	113354

Also a number of LVTs in the distance at the left of the photo, near Erika:

Name:  LVTs.jpg
Views: 144
Size:  31.0 KB

These latter ones also appear in another photo taken across the Gap, with what I think is another armoured bulldozer:

Click image for larger version

Name:	Buffalo's en D7A bij Erika (Nationaal Archief 2.24.01.03 900-2001).jpg
Views:	3
Size:	853.9 KB
ID:	113356

Zoomed in:

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Name:	LVTs and bulldozer.jpg
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ID:	113357
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  #86  
Old 06-05-20, 12:17
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
At least four Armoured Dozers could be found as spoils of war on the beaches for many years after the fighting
I found most of the remaining ones

Let’s begin on the southern side, near Erika. You identified one bulldozer there, labelled “D”; a second one stood nearby, but I’ve never seen a photo of one. However, I do have a photocopy of a map of this area made (most likely) by Rijkswaterstaat as a plan for the construction of the new dyke, which was given to me about 15 years ago when I was involved in the construction of a large 1:150 scale diorama of the construction of the new dyke, for which I supplied scratchbuilt models of two armoured bulldozers and two LVT (4)s. I recently managed to find it again, and it is what seems to be an accurate map of the situation at the time, with four “tanks” marked on it. An annotation by the man who gave me the map indicates two were Buffalos and two were bulldozers:

Click image for larger version

Name:	Erika map.jpeg
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ID:	113888 (north is to the right)

The bulldozer Hanno labelled “D” is the one on the left (south) on the map, and the Buffalo nearby is then obviously the one also shown in the photo of bulldozer “D”. Though I’m not sure where he got the data what the other two vehicles were exactly, and because he passed away last year I can’t go and ask, given that he had extensive knowledge relating to the war and the works on the dyke, and had spent his whole working life at Rijkswaterstaat, I’m confident this is correct.

(By the way, Landingsvaartuig means “landing craft”. These were three LCT (3)s left behind, two of which are in the background on the same photo.)

Then there’s the one I think was on the beach — see a previous post by me above. Though it’s really just a silhouette, it looks like an armoured bulldozer to me,

That gives us, what, six present and accounted for? Oh yeah, and one bulldozer was on board LCT 513 that turned back, so that’s seven. Let’s find the remaining two …

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Name:	Bulldozer on dyke.jpeg
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ID:	113889 Click image for larger version

Name:	Bulldozer behind dyke.jpg
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ID:	113890
(both photos by Neeltje Flipse-Roelse, courtesy of Polderhuis Westkapelle)

I don’t think I’d ever seen these two photos until yesterday night, or if I had, then I hadn’t really looked at them. After double-checking the location of the first one, it’s clearly on top of the old dyke and not one of the three left on the beach, because those are a long way behind the big wall in front of/below it — which is the antitank wall the Germans built on the landward side of the dyke (it wasn’t freestanding, the foot of the dyke was dug away and the wall built into it so there was a sheer drop off the dyke). In the second photo, which is older because there’s no new dyke yet, you can see the same dozer in the background, plus one drowned in the sea just south of the village proper.

From the knowledge I picked up in this thread, I take it the second photo is of a D6? The other one looks to me like it could be a D7. I’m wondering if it’s the same one shown in the better-known photo of a bulldozer actually at work in Westkapelle:

Click image for larger version

Name:	D7A (Sgt. C. Crocker, Beeldbank Zeeland 40022).jpg
Views:	3
Size:	126.9 KB
ID:	113891
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  #87  
Old 06-05-20, 12:51
David Herbert David Herbert is offline
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Jakko,
I see the drowned dozer in your second photo above as a D6 and the working one in your last photo as a D7. This is based solely on the position of the air intakes.

David
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  #88  
Old 12-06-20, 15:00
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno Spoelstra View Post
A very good source of film is IWM Catalogue number COI 495 "WALCHEREN LANDINGS [Allocated Title]"

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/i...ect/1060021679



It contains a lot of footage of the AFVs landing on the beach, and in action further north towards Domburg and the Black Hut area.
I was watching this film carefully today (should have done that sooner …) and noticed some interesting details. One of them is that the last digit of the census number of Wolf of Badenoch is a 5:

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Name:	Wolf of Badenoch.jpg
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ID:	114517
(this is a still from 8:25 minutes into the film)

That makes the number most likely T148325 by my reckoning, though it could also be T148325, T148825 or T143325 (in descending order of likelihood, in my opinion).

Also, there doesn’t appear to be a name on this side of the tank.
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  #89  
Old 12-06-20, 15:29
MicS MicS is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jakko Westerbeke View Post
I was watching this film carefully today (should have done that sooner …) and noticed some interesting details. One of them is that the last digit of the census number of Wolf of Badenoch is a 5:

Attachment 114517
(this is a still from 8:25 minutes into the film)

That makes the number most likely T148325 by my reckoning, though it could also be T148325, T148825 or T143325 (in descending order of likelihood, in my opinion).

Also, there doesn’t appear to be a name on this side of the tank.

Great find of the last missing T-number of WOLF OF BADENOCH Jakko! I should also have looked at this clip more carefully sooner!

I believe the number is T-148025. See for example this photo:


Click image for larger version

Name:	No.10 '5 BRAMBLE' - rear right view - T14802x - FO039995.jpg
Views:	5
Size:	174.7 KB
ID:	114518

Michel
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  #90  
Old 13-06-20, 12:02
Jakko Westerbeke Jakko Westerbeke is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MicS View Post
I believe the number is T-148025. See for example this photo:
I don’t think a 0 fits:

Click image for larger version

Name:	Sherman „Wolf of Badenoch” 31 juli 1946 B.jpg
Views:	2
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ID:	114532

There seems to be a “dent” on the left-hand side of the fourth digit that makes a 3 more likely than either a 0, IMHO (or, for that matter, a 6, an 8 or a 9).

I’m still wondering why the numbers are dark like this. My theory is the white paint has flaked off and either took the British paint with it, exposing American OD or British SCC 2 underneath, or the “shadows” are SCC 15 that hasn’t discoloured as much as the paint around it.

Then again, I would also love to know what the dark stain at the rear of the side plate is … I’m leaning to more paint from someone cleaning a brush, possibly a medium green (which might show up darker in black and white photos than an OD-like shade).
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