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  #31  
Old 27-11-21, 04:44
Mike Cecil Mike Cecil is offline
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With the Vic Office of the National Archives of Aust still closed and delaying access to some research files I need, work on our home completed, and the weather decidedly cooler, I had the chance to get some work done on the Ford GPW.

Still some items to be done such as the steering hub seals, steering box, and so on. I have an original set of steering hub seals, but when unpacked, the felt strips had gone rock hard. I've had one soaking in oil to see if it will become pliable, but after a couple of days of immersion, it's looking like a lost cause. Will have to purchase a new set.

New steering hub king pin bearing races and cups, all Timken, fitted. When it comes to bearings and seals, I believe in buying a known brand of good quality from a supplier like Rockauto, as many of the traditional jeep parts suppliers don't state the brand they are selling, and I won't risk getting cheap bearings or seals (having been 'bitten' a couple of times).

All brake drums were machined, externally sand blasted, and painted both externally and internally (masking off the machined braking surface.) Wheel bearings all cleaned, checked with a magnifier and, as they showed little sign of wear, repacked with grease. New Timken double-lip seals used on all wheel hubs. Wheel bearings are easy to get at if any do develop a problem - I don't take that risk with transfer case or gear box bearings.

New brakes lines manufactured, fitted, bled and the brake linings adjusted. Wheels sandblasted, primed, painted and fitted with new Firestone tubes, flaps and Deestone 6-ply 600-16 tyres. I opted for Deestone tyres this time as they were substantially cheaper than STA or Goodyear, but still have good reviews regarding quality. The supplier, Giga Tires, was prompt in despatching them, too.

Mike
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  #32  
Old 27-11-21, 15:37
David Dunlop David Dunlop is offline
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Just a thought, Mike.

Perhaps over time, the felt has hardened and compacted enough that oil is just too dense to penetrate and restore the felt any more. Maybe something a lot thinner like varsol or mineral sprits would be needed to start the restoration/reactivating process and once the felt can absorb that thinner fluid, switch the soaking over to an oil.

David
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  #33  
Old 27-11-21, 19:06
Mike Cecil Mike Cecil is offline
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Default Good thought...

Thanks David, good suggestion.

I used oil on the basis that that is what the hub was designed to contain, but will give something more fluid a try.Fingers crossed.

Mike
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  #34  
Old 28-11-21, 00:44
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Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
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Default Diffs

Hi , Very nice work.

I'm about to assemble the diffs, not done this tricky job before. A few pointers on how you set up the crownwheel tooth pattern ? Greendot319 on utube said lipstick is the best tooth pattern marker !


The felt seals: I bought the cheap generic aftermarket seal kit as a temporary fix, the kit has the thin steel retainers..made in India.
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1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
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  #35  
Old 28-11-21, 01:28
Mike Cecil Mike Cecil is offline
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Hi Mike,

Diffs: yep, I took them to an expert! Didn't have the confidence to set them up myself.

Mike
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  #36  
Old 07-12-21, 03:19
Mike Cecil Mike Cecil is offline
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Default Two forward ... one back

Assembled the steering, then the clutch/clutch housing/gearbox/transfer case to the engine and put the combination into the chassis. I left the engine 'short' without peripherals, intending to mount these once the engine was in the chassis. All went well until I began tightening the head studs. One stripped the thread out of the block. Bu **er!

Waiting on helicoils to arrive so I can fix the problem. Plenty else to do in the meantime.

Re David Dunlop's post, the front hub seals are soaking in WD40, which seems to be doing the trick. Just in case, I ordered a set of front/rear gaskets from RFJP, made by JMP. The pack is here, but remains unopened while I await the result of the soaking.

No, everything has not gone sideways ... I rotated the image but it still presents ... sideways!

Mike
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  #37  
Old 07-12-21, 14:14
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Mike Kelly Mike Kelly is offline
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Bad luck with that buggered block thread. The block threads are somewhat delicate and can be damaged/stressed during the process of removing the old studs , particularly if there's any crud or corrosion on the end of the old studs.

The repro head studs available are often low quality .The studs I bought are a loose fit in my GPW block. I am thinking maybe I can machine up some new studs . The experts reckon it's best to tighten the block studs only finger tight and use permatex sealant on the threads.
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1940 cab 11 C8
1940 Morris-Commercial PU
1941 Morris-Commercial CS8
1940 Chev. 15cwt GS Van ( Aust.)
1942-45 Jeep salad
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