MLU FORUM

MLU FORUM (http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/index.php)
-   Post-war Military Vehicles (http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=8)
-   -   M37 Restoration (53-41242) (http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/showthread.php?t=27995)

David Herbert 15-06-20 12:37

I like the rotisserie, a nice piece of innovation but it took me a moment to work out what the ladder and ridge pole was for.

It is amazing how a coat of paint cheers things up. Soon you will be building up a 'new' truck.

David

Wayne Hingley 15-06-20 17:08

1 Attachment(s)
I was working under the threat of a rogue rain cloud coming by, so a plan for quick cover was necessary. Yes I agree, a bit of paint cheers things up, and gets me one step closer to another milestone.

David Dunlop 15-06-20 17:19

Great alternate use for a cargo tarp, Wayne! A little higher and you could get one heck of a family gathering dinner table under it!

David

rob love 15-06-20 17:37

Not a cargo tarp, but a center section of modular. They are perfect for this type of thing.....hard to find a better tarp for corded firewood.

super dave 18-06-20 06:23

2 Attachment(s)
So you are probably going to need this pretty soon at the pace you are going :).

Wayne Hingley 18-06-20 07:12

I think your right...
 
Yes, that will be a desirable addition. It looks great Dave! Just say when you want me to drop by...

Wayne Hingley 18-06-20 07:54

2 Attachment(s)
My outdoor painting has been stalled by rain for the past two days, but I did get one coat of green on when the sun was still shining. Maybe more tomorrow.

Lynn Eades 18-06-20 23:58

Dave, excuse my ignorance, but what does the filtery thingy between the oil gallery and the oil filler do? Pressure relief valve?

Looking great Wayne.

Wayne Hingley 19-06-20 00:51

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lynn Eades (Post 270279)
Dave, excuse my ignorance, but what does the filtery thingy between the oil gallery and the oil filler do? Pressure relief valve?

Looking great Wayne.

Hi Lynn, I think its the angle of the photo that makes it look like the fittings are connected... but I think you are looking at the oil pressure sending unit (brass color). Its not connected to the filler spout, but it looks that way due to the angle of the photo.

Lynn Eades 19-06-20 05:36

Thanks Wayne. I was easily fooled by my eyes but what I saw made no sense. Cheers.

Peter Phillips 27-06-20 20:06

That is coming along nicely Wayne! I have to admit I'm a bit puzzled on everyone's troubled experiences breaking down split rim tires? As a 5-ton driver in 1 & 2 Svc Bn, we had to break down 10.00 x 20.00 NDT's quite a lot with a only a tire sledge and spoon. We did use a cage for re-inflating. Probably the only safety related item I ever seen used in the military! Is it the corrosion that's stopping these from breaking down? I found a liberal amount of soapy water and a few well placed blows with the sledge would loosen the bead easily. And as murphy's law goes, it was always the inside duals that went flat usually from spent shell casing penetrations. Now this was back in 1986.........

Clint Tauber 27-06-20 20:53

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter Phillips (Post 270516)
That is coming along nicely Wayne! I have to admit I'm a bit puzzled on everyone's troubled experiences breaking down split rim tires? As a 5-ton driver in 1 & 2 Svc Bn, we had to break down 10.00 x 20.00 NDT's quite a lot with a only a tire sledge and spoon. We did use a cage for re-inflating. Probably the only safety related item I ever seen used in the military! Is it the corrosion that's stopping these from breaking down? I found a liberal amount of soapy water and a few well placed blows with the sledge would loosen the bead easily. And as murphy's law goes, it was always the inside duals that went flat usually from spent shell casing penetrations. Now this was back in 1986.........

They come apart easily, on trucks that see frequent use. Not so much after sitting in a field for years, with water accumulating inside the rim, slowly rusting away. They often have to be cut off the rims after a few decades.

Phil Waterman 28-06-20 01:24

You raise an interesting point
 
Hi Clint

You raise a couple of interesting points about tires and rims that have had a chance to sit and rust together.

I've dealt with CMPs tires that had sat for years but would hold air or in the case of run flats hold shape. When they are on a truck that is driveable then driving around on the tires at low or no air pressure seems to make easier to break the tire down. But as often happens you end up dealing with tires and rims from a non running truck that has had a real chance to rust together.

One of my trucks had a mix of run flats and regular military tires and was running and driveable so it got the let the air out and drive it around the circle a dozen times in both directions. On that one the regular tires came off with some serious tire iron work while the run flats had to be cut off with a sawsall. This problem is aggravated by the bead locks more area to get rusted together.

Now once the rims are clean and well painted and on a truck that is regularly driven it is not a big deal to break down tires. One particular trick I've learned is take your time get the tire laying flat at comfortable working height then take two 24 to 30 inch tire irons and stick the first irons in and lean on it while sticking the second iron in next it repeat over an over as you walk your way around the tire TWICE. It doesn't seem to be a matter of pushing real hard just let your weigh do the work. It seems that that trick is the TWICE around one my trucks even with tires that have been on for ten years they come apart at this point.

How I figure this trick out was watching a professional tire guy break set CMP tires off the rims. It was in a big truck tire shop and the young gorilla that was trying to break down the first tire and rim mounted up tire on the big power unit and started the machine at full power putting as much force as he could. The professional (boss) came over and said don't beat up the machine, just let the bead breaking wheel run around the tire a couple of times at medium pressure. Couple of times around an there was that satisfying clank as one half of the rim separated from tire. Turn the tire around and repeat. When the rim halves were out the boss laughed when he saw the solid rubber bead lock.

Cheers Phil

Wayne Hingley 08-07-20 08:13

2 Attachment(s)
Thanks to the handy work of Super Dave I have my engine back, and Im looking forward to dropping it in very soon...

Wayne Hingley 08-07-20 08:33

5 Attachment(s)
Differentials, transfer case and transmission all got new seals, gaskets and bearings as needed. PTO is mounted on the transmission and backlash set. Iím just waiting for two more seals to arrive to complete the drivetrain components. All five tires mounted on the wheels (proper safety precautions taken). ;)

BCA 08-07-20 16:33

Serial number
 
Nice job Wayne. Were you able to spot the hand-stamped serial number on the outer left frame rail near the forward rear spring hanger? Faintly stamped and should match the glove box door serial number.

Wayne Hingley 08-07-20 16:40

1 Attachment(s)
Hi Brian. Yes the s/n was clearly visible and does match my data plates.

chris vickery 08-07-20 17:00

Isn’t the tire supposed to go in the cage ? Lol
Cage isn’t going to protect the guy taking the picture....

rob love 08-07-20 18:04

Sorry to be critical, but I can't say I am a fan of using those Michelin radials on a restoration that is at this level.

David Herbert 08-07-20 19:34

I am sorry Wayne but I agree with Rob. Bar Grips are so easily available (at least here in the UK) and in keeping with the truck. I do grant you though that the Michelins will last longer, give you more grip on the road and probably be quieter too but having done this nice a job so far......

David

Wayne Hingley 08-07-20 20:52

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Herbert (Post 270817)
I am sorry Wayne but I agree with Rob. Bar Grips are so easily available (at least here in the UK) and in keeping with the truck. I do grant you though that the Michelins will last longer, give you more grip on the road and probably be quieter too but having done this nice a job so far......

David

I don't disagree gentlemen. I expected to draw some fire with those tires... I would also prefer to have some new bar-grips on the truck, but its really an economic decision at the moment. The new condition Michelin's fell into my hands at a price I couldn't refuse. Ill be watching for the opportunity to change them out when I recharge the hobby funding pool.

David Herbert 08-07-20 21:01

That sounds like a convincing argument !

David

Bruce Parker 08-07-20 21:32

Find a second set of rims and mount bar grips on those. One set for travel and one for show.

rob love 08-07-20 22:17

2 Attachment(s)
A tire I would recommend for the M37, if you must go the radial route, is the 8.25-16 Michelen from the G-wagon. Very close to the original size, and they have a nice mud and snow tread pattern on them. They also don't have the balloonish look of the LSVW tires.
The entire fleet has had those tires replaced in the last year, so lots on the market. Toronto has been putting them up for sale on CADC a pallet at a time, still with their rims. While the first palletloads went for $1500 or so, the price has crept down to under $400 for a pallet of 5.
I have put those tires on the limbers and some other pieces around the museum.

Wayne Hingley 09-07-20 07:43

Those do look to be a nice fitting tire Rob. My next move will be to get the proper 9.00 - 16 bar grips though. The current Michelin tires will get me through until the truck is complete and on the road. Once the border opens up, Ill be able to make a run to the US to avoid the expensive shipping in to Canada. Also it would be nice if our dollar strengthens a bit. The exchange rate adds a further sting.

Wayne Hingley 09-07-20 08:01

Rob, if you get a chance post a few more photos of that M37 with the shelter. I have the same shelter.

Wayne Hingley 13-07-20 07:39

1 Attachment(s)
A few hours of progress today. A larger workspace would be nice.

Wayne Hingley 02-10-20 05:32

4 Attachment(s)
Cab tub progress... Well the hard part of painting the tub is complete. There are some very hard to get areas on these tubs. Mostly due to the seat boxes creating some narrow spaces and difficult angles to shoot paint. Having one of the small paint guns sure helps.

Peter Phillips 11-10-20 19:23

Looks fantastic Wayne! Hoping to get down your way this month sometime and stopping by to see this in person.

Wayne Hingley 12-10-20 23:03

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter Phillips (Post 273088)
Looks fantastic Wayne! Hoping to get down your way this month sometime and stopping by to see this in person.

Drop by anytime Pete. Iíve got lots of parts to bolt on, so Iíll put you to work when youíre here. :p


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:01.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © Maple Leaf Up, 2003-2016